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Table of Contents

  1. Hemp Biofuel Videos
  2. Hemp Chemical Videos
  3. Hemp > OIL
  4. Industrial Oil Uses
    1. Household Products
    2. Organic Cosmetics
    3. Paints & Varnishes
  5. Diesel Fuel
    1. Ford Model-T
    2. Hemp Biofuel
    3. E85 Ethanol
    4. GREEN Energy
    5. Non-Toxic Organics
    6. Petroleum Fuels
    7. NOT 'Fossil Fuel'
    8. Dirty Fossil Fuels
  6. Hemp Radio Show

Related Resources

ANYTHING made from hydrocarbon fossil fuels,
could be made from organic carbohydrates!

"Henry Ford's first Model-T was built to run on hemp gasoline and the car itself was constructed from hemp. On his large estate, Ford was photographed among his hemp fields. The car, 'grown from the soil,' had hemp plastic panels whose impact strength was 10x stronger than steel" — Popular Mechanics (1941)

Hemp seed oil can be used to produce ORGANIC non-toxic diesel fuel, lamp lighting, household detergents, stain removers, printing inks, paints, varnishes, lubricants, resins, and oils. Because hemp seeds account for up to half the weight of a mature hemp plant, hemp seed is a viable source for these products. In industrial 'chemicals', hempseed oil is similar to linseed oil. Superior quality paints and varnishes were made from hemp seed oil until 1937.

Testimony before Congress against the 1937 Marijuana Tax Act: "58,000 tons of hemp seeds were used in America for paint products in 1935" — Sherman Williams Paint Co.

"Why use up the forests which were centuries in the making and the mines which required ages to lay down, if we can get the equivalent of forest and mineral products in the annual growth of the hemp fields?" — Henry Ford

"Make the most you can of the Indian Hemp seed and sow it everywhere." — George Washington 1794

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Hemp Oil BioFuels

Hemp Oil Chemicals, Cosmetics, Soaps

Could Hemp Replace All USA Oil Uses?

Boycott BP Brands
Hemp seeds are 40% oil
and can be used to create natural organic ethanol OR methanol. Ethanol blends of 10%-15% blend massively reduces emissions. Pure Ethanol releases NO black soot like how oil dirties car engines and exhaust pipes.

  • Farming 6% of the continental U.S. acreage with biomass crops would provide all of America's energy needs.
  • Hemp is Earth's number-one biomass resource; it is capable of producing 10 tons per acre in four months.
  • Biomass can be converted to methane, methanol, or gasoline at a cost comparable to petroleum, and hemp is much better for the environment. Pyrolysis (charcoalizing), or biochemical composting are two methods of turning hemp into fuel.
  • Hemp can produce 10x more methanol than corn.
  • Hemp fuel burns clean. Petroleum causes acid rain due to sulfur pollution.
  • The use of hemp fuel does not contribute to environmental pollution nor "global climate change".

Industrial Uses for Hemp Oil

Green Energy

Hemp seed oil can be used to produce ORGANIC non-toxic diesel fuel, lamp lighting, household detergents, stain removers, printing inks, paints, varnishes, lubricants, resins, and oils. Because hemp seeds account for up to half the weight of a mature hemp plant, hemp seed is a viable source for these products.

 

In industrial 'chemicals', hempseed oil is similar to linseed oil. Quality paints and varnishes were made from hemp seed oil until 1937.

Testimony before Congress against the 1937 Marijuana Tax Act:
"58,000 tons of hemp seeds were used in America for paint products in 1935"
— Sherman Williams Paint Co.

 

Household Products Made From Hemp Oil

Organic Hemp Oil Products
  • Soap, shampoo, bath gels, cosmetics (save the whales)
  • Oil paints (even canvas), Sistine Chapel, varnishes, solvents
  • Chainsaw oil
  • Putty, coatings
  • Abrasive fluids
  • Oakum wax used as a sealant on boats like Old Ironsides

 

Non-Toxic Make-Up Cosmetics
+ ORGANIC Soap, Creams & Lotions

Hemp Oil Accessories Hemp Hand Soap Hemp Foot Creme
Household Hemp Products Hemp Cosmetics
Household Products we can make BETTER with hemp

 

Hemp Shield Penetrating Wood Finish

 

SUPERIOR Gasoline, Diesel Fuel, Jet Fuel

Hemp Traders Industrial Hempseed Motor OILHemp Powered Car
Hemp ethanol or methanol as an automobile fuel is another potential use.

Almost any biomass material can be converted to create methanol or ethanol, and these fuels burn cleanly with less carbon monoxide and higher octane than fossil fuels.

In fact, the diesel engine was invented to burn fuel from agriculture waste yet ended up burning unrefined petroleum. Hempseed oil can be refined to produce a type of hemp gasoline.

Hemp stalks are rich in fiber and cellulose with potential for use in the generation of energy. The hemp stalk can be converted to a charcoal-like substance through a process called pyrolysis, and used for power generation and to produce industrial feed stocks. Auto giant Henry Ford was a pioneer in the pyrolysis process, and operated a biomass pyrolytic plant at Iron Mountain in northern Michigan.

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"Henry Ford's first Model-T was built to run on hemp gasoline and the car itself was constructed from hemp. On his large estate, Ford was photographed among his hemp fields. The car, 'grown from the soil,' had hemp plastic panels whose impact strength was 10x stronger than steel"
— Popular Mechanics, 1941.

Biofuel is any fuel derived from relatively recently-dead biological material. Biofuels are used to power vehicles, heat cornstoves and cooking stoves. Used vegetable oil is increasingly being processed into biodiesel and soy is used in 80% of USA biodiesel fuels which reduce greenhouse gas emissions, deforestation, pollution, and the rate of biodegradation. Even landfill gas can be burned for heat and to generate electricity for public consumption.

Biodiesel Fuels Transesterification of a vegetable oil was conducted as early as 1853 by scientists E. Duffy and J. Patrick, many years before the first diesel engine became functional. Rudolf Diesel's prime model, a single 10 ft (3 m) iron cylinder with a flywheel at its base, ran on its own power for the first time in Augsburg Germany on August 10th 1893 running on nothing but peanut oil. In remembrance of this event, August 10th has been declared "International Biodiesel Day".

Fuel - Biodiesel Documentary Movie
It is often reported that Diesel designed his engine to run on peanut oil, but this is not the case. Diesel stated in his published papers, "at the Paris Exhibition in 1900 (Exposition Universelle) there was shown by the Otto Company a small Diesel engine, which, at the request of the French government ran on arachide (earth-nut or pea-nut) oil (see biodiesel and "achene"), and worked so smoothly that only a few people were aware of it. The engine was constructed for using mineral oil, and was then run on vegetable oil without any alterations being made. The French Government at the time thought of testing the applicability to power production of the Arachide, or earth-nut, which grows in considerable quantities in their African colonies, and can easily be cultivated there." Diesel himself later conducted related tests and appeared supportive of the idea. In a 1912 speech Rudolph Diesel said, "the use of vegetable oils for engine fuels may seem insignificant today but such oils may become, in the course of time, as important as petroleum and the coal-tar products of the present time."

Despite the widespread use of fossil petroleum-derived diesel fuels, interest in vegetable oils as fuels for internal combustion engines was reported in several countries during the 1920s and 1930s and later during World War II. Belgium, France, Italy, the United Kingdom, Portugal, Germany, Brazil, Argentina, Japan and China were reported to have tested and used vegetable oils as diesel fuels during this time. Some operational problems were reported due to the high viscosity of vegetable oils compared to petroleum diesel fuel, which results in poor atomization of the fuel in the fuel spray and often leads to deposits and coking of the injectors, combustion chamber and valves. Attempts to overcome these problems included heating of the vegetable oil, blending it with petroleum-derived diesel fuel or ethanol, pyrolysis and cracking of the oils.

On 31 August 1937, G. Chavanne of the University of Brussels (Belgium) was granted a patent for a "Procedure for the transformation of vegetable oils for their uses as fuels" (fr. "Procédé de Transformation d’Huiles Végétales en Vue de Leur Utilisation comme Carburants") Belgian Patent 422,877. This patent described the alcoholysis (often referred to as transesterification) of vegetable oils using ethanol (and mentions methanol) in order to separate the fatty acids from the glycerol by replacing the glycerol with short linear alcohols. This appears to be the first account of the production of what is known as "biodiesel" today.

Hemp Biofuel
More recently, in 1977, Brazilian scientist Expedito Parente invented and submitted for patent, the first industrial process for the production of biodiesel. This process is classified as biodiesel by international norms, conferring a "standardized identity and quality. No other proposed biofuel has been validated by the motor industry." Currently, Parente's company Tecbio is working with Boeing and NASA to certify bioquerosene (bio-kerosene), another product produced and patented by the Brazilian scientist.

Research into the use of transesterified sunflower oil, and refining it to diesel fuel standards, was initiated in South Africa in 1979. By 1983, the process for producing fuel-quality, engine-tested biodiesel was completed and published internationally. An Austrian company, Gaskoks, obtained the technology from the South African Agricultural Engineers; the company erected the first biodiesel pilot plant in November 1987, and the first industrial-scale plant in April 1989 (with a capacity of 30,000 tons of canola rapeseed per annum).

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Throughout the 1990s, plants were opened in many European countries, including the Czech Republic, Germany and Sweden. France launched local production of biodiesel fuel (referred to as diester) from rapeseed canola oil, which is mixed into regular diesel fuel at a level of 5%, and into the diesel fuel used by some captive fleets (e.g. public transportation) at a level of 30%. Renault, Peugeot and other manufacturers have certified truck engines for use with up to that level of partial biodiesel; experiments with 50% biodiesel are underway. During the same period, nations in other parts of the world also saw local production of biodiesel starting up: by 1998, the Austrian Biofuels Institute had identified 21 countries with commercial biodiesel projects. 100% Biodiesel is now available at many normal service stations across Europe.

E85 is 85% ethanol +15% gasoline. The United States produces mainly biodiesel and ethanol fuel, which uses corn as the main feedstock. In 2005, the U.S. overtook Brazil as the world's largest ethanol producer. In 2006 the US produced 4.855 billion gallons of ethanol. Highly lignified wood is durable and therefore a good raw material for many applications.

It is also an excellent fuel, since lignin yields more energy when burned than cellulose. Just as corn can be converted into clean-burning ethanol fuel, so can hemp. Because hemp produces more biomass than any plant species (including corn) that can be grown in a wide range of climates and locations, hemp has great potential to become a major source of ethanol fuel.

Hemp seeds are 40% oil and can be used to create natural organic ethanol OR methanol. Ethanol blends of 10%-15% blend massively reduces emissions. Pure Ethanol releases NO black soot like how oil dirties car engines and exhaust pipes.

Growing "GREEN" Energy for Fuel & Electricity!

Biomass vs. Fossil Fuels How Marijuana Could Become Energy

Remember it's "ORGANIC"?...
HEMP IS NON-TOXIC!!!

"In strict medical terms marijuana is far safer than many foods we commonly consume. It is physically impossible to eat enough marijuana to induce death. Marijuana, in its natural form, is one of the safest therapeutically active substances known to man."
— Francis L. Young, Administrative Law Judge of the US drug police DEA, Sept. 6, 1988

Replace Petroleum Oil
Carbon TAXES paid to Blood and Gore

 

Petroleum Fossil Fuel "OIL" vs. Hemp Oil

FUEL big Green Energy Bus
Hemp Motor Oil vs. Conventional and Synthetic Motor Oils
Petrol Pollution vs. Green Hemp Oil

 

Oil is NOT a "Fossil Fuel"!

Fossils have NEVER been found at depths where they drill for oil. Hydrocarbons are MISSING OXYGEN = NOT-ORGANIC! Regardless of what OIL men advertise in wikipedia: OIL is NOT an "organic compound"!

 

British Petroleum's New Logo
Contaminated Oceans from Oil Rigs Dead Dolphins from Gulf Oil Spill
Don't Buy BP Gasoline Oil on Beaches Boycott BP Oil Brands
Oil Wars

 

OTG Radio Show About Industrial Hemp

Industrial Hemp #1 - #4
Religion, Soil, Biomass

Hemp Products #5 - #7
Fabric, Paper, Plastic, Food

Hemp Chemicals #8
BioFuel: Gasoline & Soaps

Hemp Homes #9 & #10
Organic Shelter & Medicinal

 

 

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