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  Organic Fiber (Cellulose) = Clothing, Fabric  

Table of Contents

  1. Hemp Cloth Videos
  2. Hemp Fiber Benefits
  3. Hemp Fiber Products
  4. Best Organic Fibers
  5. Long Fibers
  6. Short Fibers
  7. Industry Competition
    1. Cotton
    2. Linen (Flax)
    3. Juut
    4. Manila Hemp
    5. Sisal
  8. Textile Fiber
  9. Natural Fibers
    1. Vegetable Fibers
    2. Wood Fiber
    3. Animal Fibers
    4. Mineral Fibers
  10. Synthetic Fibers
  11. Microfibers
  12. Hemp Radio Show

Related Resources

ANYTHING made from hydrocarbon fossil fuels,
could be made from organic carbohydrates!

Among the characteristics of hemp fiber are its superior strength and durability, and its stunning resistance to rot, attributes that made hemp integral to the shipping industry. The strong, woody bast fiber is extracted from the stalk by a process known as decortication. Hemp fiber contains a low amount of lignin, the organic glue that binds plant cells, which allows for environmentally friendly bleaching without the use of chlorine. In composite form, hemp is twice as strong as wood. All products made with hemp fiber are biodegradable.

"Why use up the forests which were centuries in the making and the mines which required ages to lay down, if we can get the equivalent of forest and mineral products in the annual growth of the hemp fields?"
Henry Ford

Fiber, also spelled fiber, is a class of materials that are continuous filaments or are in discrete elongated pieces, similar to lengths of thread. They are very important in the biology of both plants and animals, for holding tissues together. Human uses for fibers are diverse. They can be spun into filaments, string or rope, used as a component of composite materials, or matted into sheets to make products such as paper or felt. Fibers are often used in the manufacture of other materials. Synthetic fibers can be produced FROM PETROLEUM OIL and in large amounts compared to natural fibers, but natural fibers enjoy some benefits, such as comfort, over their man-made counterparts.

"Hemp is of first necessity to the wealth & protection of the country."
Thomas Jefferson

"Make the most you can of the Indian Hemp seed and sow it everywhere."
George Washington 1794

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Benefits of Organic Cellulose Hemp Fibers

Hemp Converse
  • Best, most superior fiber
  • Longest strongest fiber in nature
  • 3/4" douglas fir vs.15' hemp fiber
  • Stronger than steel
  • Lighter than steel
  • More breathable materials
  • Clothes last longer with less wear
  • Organic = safe non-toxic materials

 

Products Made From Hemp Fibers

  • Textiles: silk - carpet backing
  • Canvas wagons - "canvas" was derived from the Arabic word for hemp
  • FLAGS, clothing (military uniforms), parachutes
  • Old Ironsides had 60 tons of hemp for rigging, sails, lines + 25" diameter anchor cable
  • Twine, rope, nets, canvas bags, tarps, carpets, geotextiles
  • Any clothing or apparel, fabrics
  • Work clothes, denims, socks, shoes, diapers, purses, fine textiles
  • Composites, plastics, molded parts, brakes, clutch linings, caulking
  • WW2 "Hemp For Victory" while India was under japanese control
  • 1942: 36,000 acres, 1943: 50,000 acre goal
Hemp Fashion Hemp Beach Pants Hemp Skirt
Hemp Jeans Hemp Purse Hemp Fabrics
Hemp Canvas Adidas Shoes Hemp Canvas Vans Shoes
Hemper Jeans

 

The Best Organic Fibers in Nature

Hollow Hemp Fiber Section
Fiber
, also spelled fiber, is a class of materials that are continuous filaments or are in discrete elongated pieces, similar to lengths of thread. They are very important in the biology of both plants and animals, for holding tissues together. Human uses for fibers are diverse. They can be spun into filaments, string or rope, used as a component of composite materials, or matted into sheets to make products such as paper or felt. Fibers are often used in the manufacture of other materials. Synthetic fibers can be produced very cheaply and in large amounts compared to natural fibers, but natural fibers enjoy some benefits, such as comfort, over their man-made counterparts.

  • Hemp is the oldest cultivated fiber plant in the world.
  • Low-THC fiber hemp varieties developed by the French and others have been available for over 20 years. It is impossible to get high from fiber hemp. Over 600,000 acres of hemp is grown worldwide with no drug misuse problem.
  • One acre of hemp can produce as much usable fiber as 4 acres of trees or two acres of cotton.
  • Trees cut down to make paper take 50 to 500 years to grow, while hemp can be cultivated in as little as 100 days and can yield 4 times more paper over a 20 year period.
  • Until 1883, from 75-90% of all paper in the world was made with cannabis hemp fiber including that for books, Bibles, maps, paper money, stocks and bonds, newspapers, etc.
  • Hemp paper is longer lasting than wood pulp, stronger, acid-free, and chlorine free. (Chlorine is estimated to cause up to 10% of all Cancers.)
  • Hemp paper can be recycled 7 times, wood pulp 4 times.
  • If the hemp pulp paper process reported by the USDA in 1916, were legal today it would soon replace 70% of all wood paper products.
  • Rag paper containing hemp fiber is the highest quality and longest lasting paper ever made. It can be torn when wet, but returns to its full strength when dry. Barring extreme conditions, rag paper remains stable for centuries.
  • Hemp particle board may be up to 2 times stronger than wood particleboard and holds nails better.
  • Hemp is softer, warmer, more water absorbent, has three times the tensile strength, and is many times more durable than cotton. Hemp production uses less chemicals than cotton.
  • From 70-90% of all rope, twine, and cordage was made from hemp until 1937.
  • A strong lustrous fiber; hemp withstands heat, mildew, insects, and is not damaged by light. Oil paintings on hemp and/or flax canvas have stayed in fine condition for centuries.

 

Hemp Twine
Among the characteristics of hemp fiber are its superior strength and durability, and its stunning resistance to rot, attributes that made hemp integral to the shipping industry. The strong, woody bast fiber is extracted from the stalk by a process known as decortication. Hemp fiber contains a low amount of lignin, the organic glue that binds plant cells, which allows for environmentally friendly bleaching without the use of chlorine. In composite form, hemp is twice as strong as wood. All products made with hemp fiber are biodegradable.

Long Fibers are extracted from the bark of the stalk, this type of fiber is called "long" because it stretches the entire length of the plant. The length of the fiber enhances the strength and durability of the finished goods. Hemp can grow to 15 feet or more, making it excellent for textile production. Hemp is most similar to flax, the fiber of linen products. By contrast, cotton fibers are approximately 1-2 mm in length and are prone to faster wear. Hemp fiber also has insulative qualities that allow clothing wearers to stay cool in summer and warm in the winter. Long hemp fiber is used in twine, cordage, textiles, paper, webbing and household goods.

Short Fibers, or "tow," are the secondary hemp fibers .. While not as strong as the long fibers, the tow is still superior to many other fibers. Tow is extracted from the long fibers during a process called "hackling," a method of combing and separating the fiber from hurd. Short fibers are used to make textiles, non-woven matting, paper, caulking, auto bodies, building materials and household goods.

Fine Hemp yarn Hemp Yarnstock

 

Competition in the Fiber Business

Chopped Hemp Strand
Cotton
is a soft, fluffy, staple fiber that grows in a boll around the seeds of the cotton plant. It is a shrub native to tropical and subtropical regions around the world, including the Americas, India and Africa. The fiber most often is spun into yarn or thread and used to make a soft, breathable textile, which is the most widely used natural-fiber cloth in clothing today.

Linen is a textile made from the fibers of the flax plant

Juut

Manila hemp

Sisal cultivation spread to Florida, the Caribbean islands and Brazil, as well as to countries in Africa, notably Tanzania and Kenya, and Asia

Hemp Twine
On an annual basis, 1 acre of hemp will produce as much fiber as 2 to 3 acres of cotton. Hemp fiber is stronger and softer than cotton, lasts twice as long as Monsanto's BT cotton, and will not mildew. Many textile products (shirts, jackets, pants, backpacks, etc.) made from 100% hemp are now available.

Cotton grows only in moderate climates and requires more water than hemp; but hemp is frost tolerant, requires only moderate amounts of water, and grows in all 50 states. Cotton requires large quantities of pesticides and herbicides--50% of the world's pesticides/herbicides are used on cotton. But hemp requires no pesticides, no herbicides, and only moderate amounts of fertilizer.

 

Hemp String Basket
Textile fiber
is a unit in which many complicated textile structures are built up. Textile Fiber is the raw material required for the textile industry.

Natural fibers include those produced by plants, animals, and geological processes. They are biodegradable over time. They can be classified according to their origin:

  • Vegetable fibers are generally based on arrangements of cellulose, often with lignin: examples include cotton, hemp, jute (India = great britain -Jute fiber is often called hessian (Rothschild's army); jute fabrics are also called hessian cloth and jute), flax, ramie (china grass), and sisal (incorrectly referred to as sisal hemp - Florida, the Caribbean islands and Brazil, as well as to countries in Africa, notably Tanzania and Kenya, and Asia). Plant fibers are employed in the manufacture of paper and textile (cloth), and dietary fiber is an important component of human nutrition.
  • Wood fiber, distinguished from vegetable fiber, is from tree sources. Forms include groundwood, thermomechanical pulp (TMP) and bleached or unbleached kraft or sulfite pulps. Kraft and sulfite, also called sulphite, refer to the type of pulping process used to remove the lignin bonding the original wood structure, thus freeing the fibers for use in paper and engineered wood products such as fiberboard.
  • Animal fibers consist largely of particular proteins. Instances are spider silk, sinew, catgut, wool and hair such as cashmere, mohair and angora, fur such as sheepskin, rabbit, mink, fox, beaver, etc.
  • Mineral fibers comprise asbestos. Asbestos is the only naturally occurring long mineral fiber. Short, fiber-like minerals include wollastonite, attapulgite and halloysite.

Colored Hemp Yarn
Synthetic or man-made fibers
generally come from [DuPont & Rockefeller] synthetic materials such as petrochemicals [OIL]. But some types of synthetic fibers are manufactured from natural cellulose, including rayon, modal, and the more recently developed Lyocell. Cellulose-based fibers are of two types, regenerated or pure cellulose such as from the cupro-ammonium process and modified cellulose such as the cellulose acetates.

Fiber classification in reinforced plastics falls into two classes: (i) short fibers, also known as discontinuous fibers, with a general aspect ratio (defined as the ratio of fiber length to diameter) between 20 to 60, and (ii) long fibers, also known as continuous fibers, the general aspect ratio is between 200 to 500.

  • Cellulose fibers are a subset of man-made fibers, regenerated from natural cellulose. The cellulose comes from various sources. Modal is made from beech trees, bamboo fiber is a cellulose fiber made from bamboo, seacell is made from seaweed, etc.
  • Mineral fibers
  • Fiberglass, made from specific glass, and optical fiber, made from purified natural quartz, are also man-made fibers that come from natural raw materials.
  • Metallic fibers can be drawn from ductile metals such as copper, gold or silver and extruded or deposited from more brittle ones, such as nickel, aluminum or iron.
  • Carbon fibers are often based on carbonised polymers, but the end product is pure carbon.
  • Polymer fibers
  • Polymer fibers are a subset of man-made fibers, which are based on synthetic chemicals (often from petrochemical sources) rather than arising from natural materials by a purely physical process. These fibers are made from:
  • polyamide nylon,
  • PET or PBT polyester
  • phenol-formaldehyde (PF)
  • polyvinyl alcohol fiber (PVA)
  • polyvinyl chloride fiber (PVC)
  • polyolefins (PP and PE)
  • acrylic polyesters, pure polyester PAN fibers are used to make carbon fiber by roasting them in a low oxygen environment. Traditional acrylic fiber is used more often as a synthetic replacement for wool. Carbon fibers and PF fibers are noted as two resin-based fibers that are not thermoplastic, most others can be melted.
  • Aromatic polyamids (aramids) such as Twaron, Kevlar and Nomex thermally degrade at high temperatures and do not melt. These fibers have strong bonding between polymer chains
  • polyethylene (PE), eventually with extremely long chains / HMPE (e.g. Dyneema or Spectra).
  • Elastomers can even be used, e.g. spandex although urethane fibers are starting to replace spandex technology.
  • polyurethane fiber
  • Coextruded fibers have two distinct polymers forming the fiber, usually as a core-sheath or side-by-side. Coated fibers exist such as nickel-coated to provide static elimination, silver-coated to provide anti-bacterial properties and aluminum-coated to provide RF deflection for radar chaff. Radar chaff is actually a spool of continuous glass tow that has been aluminum coated. An aircraft-mounted high speed cutter chops it up as it spews from a moving aircraft to confuse radar signals.

Hemp Microfibers
Microfibers
in textiles refer to sub-denier fiber (such as polyester drawn to 0.5 dn). Denier and Detex are two measurements of fiber yield based on weight and length. If the fiber density is known you also have a fiber diameter, otherwise it is simpler to measure diameters in micrometers. Microfibers in technical fibers refer to ultra fine fibers (glass or meltblown thermoplastics) often used in filtration.

Newer fiber designs include extruding fiber that splits into multiple finer fibers. Most synthetic fibers are round in cross-section, but special designs can be hollow, oval, star-shaped or trilobal. The latter design provides more optically reflective properties. Synthetic textile fibers are often crimped to provide bulk in a woven, non woven or knitted structure. Fiber surfaces can also be dull or bright. Dull surfaces reflect more light while bright tends to transmit light and make the fiber more transparent.

Very short and/or irregular fibers have been called fibrils. Natural cellulose, such as cotton or bleached kraft, show smaller fibrils jutting out and away from the main fiber structure.

 

OTG Radio Show About Industrial Hemp

Industrial Hemp #1 - #4
Religion, Soil, Biomass

Hemp Products #5 - #7
Fabric, Paper, Plastic, Food

Hemp Chemicals #8
BioFuel: Gasoline & Soaps

Hemp Homes #9 & #10
Organic Shelter & Medicinal

 

 

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